Rehabbing Restricted Equine Motion by Allen Gutowski

Check out the current issue of Modern Equine Vet for ECB Spa client Dr. Steve Adair's recommendations on rehabbing horses. Dr. Adair runs the University of Tennessee's Veterinary Teaching Hospital. CLICK HERE for the article. 

“The ECB Equine Spa is an integral part of our management of equine distal limb swelling resulting from wounds, tendonitis and lymphedema. It significantly reduces overall hospitalization time in these cases.”

— Dr. Steve Adair, III, MS, DVM, DACVS - Associate Professor of Equine Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tennessee – Knoxville

Haras du Saubouas in France Expands and Installs ECB Spa by Allen Gutowski

Paul Basquin of Haras du Saubouas on adding high-quality equipment, like the spa:

"We work with a lot of trainers from the South-West and different veterinary clinics. We regularly receive horses at rest and also horses who need care. The spa is, to me, the most efficient thalassotherapy machine. It allows the treatment of tendon injuries and bone damages with excellent results and upgraded recovery time. It also ensures to ease the limbs and joints after a big effort or a trauma. It is very efficient in the case of a laminitis. It is full of very cold saline water (2 degrees), with oxygen coming through the ground and spread on the limbs at a high pressure. This water can cover all the joints, fetlocks, knees and hocks."

Ice, Ice, Baby: The science of hydrotherapy | HORSE NATION by Allen Gutowski

Check out this article from Horse Nation:

Applying hot and/or cold treatments to our horses is an everyday occurrence, but do you know why it works? Amanda Moretz, a vet tech and equine massage therapist, explains.

From Amanda:

The act of hosing off a horse takes place on a daily basis in barns throughout the world–most commonly for horses who have just finished a workout and need to be cooled down and have all the sweat cleaned from their coats.  It is also common after multiple forms of injuries, using cold water on the area that was affected.  Or maybe the horse just had a very intense workout or show and the owner is soaking its legs in cold water after the ride.  All of these are everyday uses of water, and most of the time it is so second-nature that horse owners do not even have to think to apply water in these ways.

All those examples plus many other forms of water application actually have a very specific science behind them that has been used for thousands of years.  The application of water in all three forms (solid, liquid and vapor) to the body is called hydrotherapy.  In hydrotherapy, the environment of the body can be changed by applying water at different temperatures via different methods.  The aim of this is to normalize the amount of blood moving in a given area by effecting the circulation.

The science behind why it works can be tedious and long-winded, but in a nutshell this is why hydrotherapy works so well:  Heat is the amount of thermal energy in an object and is measured in the term calorie.  Digging back to high school we can remember that heat transfers from the object of higher temperature to the lower one, and also that water is an excellent conductor of heat.  But also remember that cold is the absence of heat.

The question becomes: How does this science lesson tie into using water treatments on horses?  By using this knowledge of how heat works and applying water we can get the results we are looking for in the horse.

Hydrotherapy includes both cold and hot water application.  Each causes its own unique reaction.  But in either case, there are three ways in which the body reacts to hydrotherapy.  The first involves local effects that occur at the area where the application of water occurs.  The second is a systemic response, meaning its effects are throughout the body.  And the third is a reflex effect that relates to the nervous system’s reaction to the treatment.

Looking back at our examples, let us see how this might play out for our horses.

Consider, for instance, the horse that has just run a tough cross country course, and the owners want to not only cool down the horse but also help keep inflammation down in the legs.  The best way to achieve this, of course, is through the use of cold water–preferably with ice in it.

Once the horse is standing in the ice water, the legs become noticeably cold and it might even be a bit uncomfortable for them.  As the temperature in their legs drop the blood circulation changes and moves into other parts of the body, leaving the legs due to the blood vessels getting smaller or constricting.  The tendons and ligaments become denser, and the muscle tone increases.  It also causes pain relief in that area.  In the whole body the blood pressure will lower, as will the heart rate.

After the horse is out of the ice water, the blood will come rushing back into the legs.  This helps raise the temperature back up to normal.  But with this rush the blood brings in fresh new oxygen, along with fresh nutrients and supplies for the cells in that area.  This also means that during the application of the ice, the toxins and old stagnant nutrients were flushed out of the cells.   And hopefully any concerns of inflammation in the structures in the legs due to any micro trauma that occurred during the exercise are decreased.

The benefits from an ice water session are numerous and affect not only the area you are treating but also, to an extent, the whole horse.  This can also be said for a heat application, which the body responds differently to than it does cold.  But with either you have a tool you can use to help your horse in a daily setting.  So the next time you rinse off your horse in this hot summer heat, remember you are using proven science to help them reach a normal body temperature through the use of hydrotherapy.

To read the full article on Horse Nation, CLICK HERE.

 

British Dressage/Showjumping Dynasty add Equine Spa to Yard by Allen Gutowski

The name Davison is synonymous to the world of Dressage and Showjumping, and this month, they added an ECB Equine Spa to their portfolio of equine equipment. Richard is a four time Olympian in Dressage and his sons Tom and Joe are both successful Showjumpers, representing Great Britain, many times, at different levels. Click for more about Davison Equestrian.

Lindy Farms: It's Better Than Kentucky by Allen Gutowski

Check out this three part series on the beautiful Lindy Farms in Connecticut... For the link to the full series CLICK HERE

"Lindy has some 30 horses in training at it farm and the horses are spoiled with the very best facilities and care — including an impressive equine therapeutic spa that features a cold water Jacuzzi, water treadmill and a vibrating floor under a gigantic heat lamp that can be lowered just above a horse’s back. Farm manager John Belskie said the spa is great for dealing with horses suffering from inflammation and soreness."

ECB Clients Winning at Spruce Meadows Masters by Allen Gutowski

Spa owner Steve Guerdat and Team Switzerland Wins BMO Nations’ Cup at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ and Team Canada takes third.... Cian O’Connor and Callisto Top Suncor Energy Winning Round 1.50m!

Guerdat has had his spa installed at his Swiss farm for a couple of years now. Cian O'Connor has one spa at his farm in Ireland and another in the USA at Adena Springs. Tiffany Foster and Eric Lamaze have a spa located at Artisan Farms in Florida.

Congratulations to all! Click below for the video highlights of the event...

 

 

ECB Equine Spa Now Available At Santa Anita Race Track by Allen Gutowski

Tyler Cerin's Equine Body Works has just installed a brand new ECB Equine Spa at the Santa Anita Race Track. For more about Tyler's background and the services he offers, CLICK HERE

As you will discover from the article, Tyler puts the well-being of the horses he works with as a top priority... and in that regard he tested out the Spa for himself before putting any of his patients in! Most clients only dip in a toe, but Tyler wanted to get the full effect...

Olympic Gold Medalist Big Star back in his daily routine of Spa Treatments by Allen Gutowski

Nick Skelton and Big Star have just won Olympic Gold in Rio... Big Star is back home and back to his regular routine, including daily spa treatments. Congratulations on a job well done! 

For full article, CLICK HERE

Rio 2016 - Great Britain's Nick Skelton & Big Star - Individual Final Round B

Waples and Alagna team up for Thursday triple by Allen Gutowski

Congratulations to ECB Spa client Tony Alagna on a great night at Mohawk Racetrack!

CAMPBELLVILLE, August 25 – The combination of driver Randy Waples and trainer Tony Alagna has been red hot at Mohawk Racetrack and Thursday night the hot streak continued.

Alagna sent out three horses on Thursday’s 10-race card and all three scored victories with Waples in the sulky. 

The successful evening for the duo began in the opening race, as rookie trotting colt Signal Hill broke his maiden with a 1:58.3 score. The son of Muscle Hill, who sold for $250,000 at last year’s Lexington Selected Yearling Sale, was making his third career start and trotted home in :27.4 for the victory.

Signal Hill is owned by Brittany Farms, David McDuffee, Marvin Katz and Adriano Sorella.

Vintage Babe gave Waples and Alagna their second victory with a 1:54.2 triumph in the third-race. The sophomore pacing filly was competing at the non-winners of two or $25,000 lifetime level and shot home in :27.3 for her third career score.

The daughter of Vintage Master is owned by Alagna Racing LLC and Jodi Siamis.

The third victory of the night for Waples and Alagna came in the eighth-race, as Winter Harbor picked up his second consecutive victory. The three-year-old son of Muscle Hill grinded away first up throughout the middle-half and pulled ahead in the lane for a 1:56.1 score.

A $240,000 yearling purchase at the 2014 Lexington Selected Yearling Sale, Winter Harbor didn’t make his three-year-old debut until August 5th and now has two wins from three starts to improve his career record to three wins in six starts. He is owned by Brittany Farms, John Cancelliere, Little E LLC and Winter Harbor Partners.

The combination of Waples and Alagna is winning at almost 50 per cent this season at Mohawk. They will team up twice on Friday’s card with a pair of impressive ladies.

Ontario Sires Stakes star Caprice Hill will be looking for her fifth win of the season in the Casual Breeze Stakes, while four-year-old pacing mare Bedroomconfessions has won four of her last five starts and goes for another victory in the Mares Preferred.

For full article, CLICK HERE

ECB Equine Spa at Gulfstream Park by Allen Gutowski

A huge THANK YOU to High Tide Equine and Tiffany Milne for taking the time to demonstrate the Spa at Gulfstream Park and for the stable tour... we loved meeting all of the incredible horses too! 

After the horses were done with their treatments, some of us humans decided to give the Spa a try... cold does not even begin to describe the water!